Tag Archives: American Revolution

The Case Against Horatio

Why the Adjutant General Corps should ditch Horatio Gates

“Surrender of General Burgoyne after Sarat0ga” by Francois Godfrey d’apres Louis-Francois-Sebastian Fauvel (via Wikimedia Commons)

I am a US Army Adjutant General Corps officer. The branch is the second oldest in the Army (behind the Infantry), founded on June 16, 1775 when Congress appointed Horatio Gates as the Continental Army’s first Adjutant General. (The Chaplain Corps sometimes claims that it’s the second oldest, but they’re wrong. They weren’t established until July 29 of that year.)

The AG Corps is supremely proud of Gates and his American Revolution fame. I’m proud of my branch, its steeped history, and the integral work we do. I am not, however, proud of the corps’ so-called founder. (As an aside, he’s sometimes called “Granny” Gates in historical accounts. The nickname has been refuted here and other places, but in at least one case, years later, Timothy Pickering called Gates “an old woman.”)

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